Cryout Loud for Righteous Medication for the Soul

untitled1.PNG Jerry Criner, also known as Cryout, has been spreading his righteous reggae beats for more than 15 years. Cryout’s latest album released, Righteous Medication for the Soul is just that, and is rumoured to be destined as a cult recording. Like typical reggae, the lyrics are optimistic and socially conscious of the things affecting the soul. You could even say this album in particular, is therapeutic reggae in its own genre of funky jazzy blues tones. Negative Vibes“, is just one example of how the tracks on this album not only suggest medicating your soul but actually is the medication itself! With blues trumpet and reggae break beats the lyrics bluntly state that you should get on a positive vibe.

The albums first track “Talking about my baby”, is lyrically Motown wrapped in reggae beats and distant bongos. La“, track number 2, makes you want to see the positive side to Los Angeles. It has just a taste of funkiness, but still holds true to the medium slow tempo reggae that the rest of this album embodies. A surprising song on this album is Drop of Water”, track 5. Its electronic entrance and blues vocals to reggae beats makes this track an amazing addition to this album. Drop of Water may be a hint of what’s to come in future albums by Cryout. Like other reggae albums true to its roots, Righteous Medication for the Soul, Funky Rasta” song is a tribute to Bob Marley as well as, to the albums other major influences, James Brown.

Righteous Medication for the Soul, consists of nine tracks of smooth reggae at its best. Its chill and upbeat lyrics carries the percussion just enough to keep your head moving and your arms swaying. Its smooth blues influenced beats joined with classic reggae is a winning combination of two very different genres. Not only does Cryout’s reggae give into the sultry rhythms of blues but Cryout also carries some Motown flavour. Chill out, relax, be happy and hear it here at BeatPick.com.

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